NEW YORK (CNS) -- The following are capsule reviews of theatrical movies on network and cable television the week of May 24. Please note that televised versions may or may not be edited for language, nudity, violence, and sexual situations. Check for local times.

Monday, May 25, 8-11 p.m. EDT (TCM) "The Best Years of Our Lives" (1946). Three World War II veterans (sergeant Fredric March, bombardier Dana Andrews and sailor Harold Russell with hooks in place of hands) meet on their way home to resume civilian lives in the same small town where they try to help each other readjust to peacetime. Director William Wyler gives sympathetic treatment to the post-war rehabilitation of returning GIs, portraying in fairly realistic detail their career difficulties as well as personal problems with wives and girlfriends (Myrna Loy, Teresa Wright, Virginia Mayo and Cathy O'Donnell). Mature themes, including a broken marriage. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III -- adults. Not rated by the Motion Picture Association.

Wednesday, May 27, 1:45-3:45 p.m. EDT (TCM) "The Singing Nun" (1966). Hollywood's tribute to the joyful spirit of a young Dominican nun is colorful, sentimental and lively, though Henry Koster's glossy direction is out of tune with the reality of a basically interior story about the difficulty of secular fame for a member of a religious community. Greer Garson as the mother superior turns in a well-balanced performance while Debbie Reynolds sings prettily, and Agnes Moorehead provides comic relief. There is some pleasant amusement, a little uplift and the music of "Soeur Sourire" is well worth hearing. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-I -- general patronage. Not rated by the Motion Picture Association.

Thursday, May 28, 8-11:05 p.m. EDT (AMC) "The Shawshank Redemption" (1994). Gritty prison drama begins in 1946 when a quiet banker (Tim Robbins) is wrongly convicted of murder, then spends the next two decades inside a brutal and corruptly run penitentiary where he has positive effects on the hapless inmates, especially another lifer (Morgan Freeman), before his unexpected departure. Director Frank Darabont does not spare viewers the dehumanizing ugliness of life behind bars in a story notable for its portrayal of a man who inspired hope in others while coping with the injustice done to him. Some graphic prison violence and suicides, crude sexual innuendo, brief nudity and much rough language. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was L -- limited adult audience, films whose problematic content many adults would find troubling. The Motion Picture Association rating was R -- restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

Saturday, May 30, 8-10:05 p.m. EDT (HBO). "Lucy in the Sky" (2019). Loosely based on a real-life love triangle involving astronauts, this drama attempts to portray how the experience of outer space has a way of altering earthbound judgments. Natalie Portman plays a robotics specialist who, bored of her affectionate but dull husband (Dan Stevens), embarks on an affair with a colleague (Jon Hamm). When her deft organizational skills decay into obsessive behavior, he diverts his amorous attentions to another spacewoman (Zazie Beetz) with drastic results for the psyche of his abandoned mistress. The plot lacks a cogent explanation for how lengthy stays in orbit corrode personalities -- other than by creating tremendous emotions that can't be replicated later. And the protagonist's romantic dilemma is the stuff of many a Lifetime movie. Though her iron will is attractive, her bad decisions remain difficult to understand. A couple of scenes of implied adulterous activity, fleeting rough and crass language. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III -- adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was R -- restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.