NEW YORK (CNS) — The following are capsule reviews of theatrical movies on network and cable television the week of June 20. Please note that televised versions may or may not be edited for language, nudity, violence, and sexual situations.

Sunday, June 20, 8-10:30 p.m. EDT (TCM) "Pride of the Yankees" (1942). Fine drama of New York Yankees first baseman Lou Gehrig (Gary Cooper), who never missed a game in 14 years of outstanding play until forced to retire in 1939 by an incurable disease which has since borne his name. Directed by Sam Wood, the result has interest beyond the story of a baseball hero because it captures the universal qualities of character and spirit underlying the career of a man who gave his unfailing best for team, fans and family. Memorable movie even for those who don't like baseball. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-I — general patronage. Not rated by the Motion Picture Association.

Tuesday, June 22, 6-8 p.m. EDT (Showtime) "The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn — Part 1" (2011). This fourth addition to the blockbuster gothic franchise opens with the nuptials of the ongoing tale's iconic but ill-assorted central pair — courteous bloodsucker Edward Cullen (Robert Pattinson) and mortal teen Bella Swan (Kristen Stewart) — chronicles their problematic honeymoon in Brazil and follows the unexpected pregnancy that results from the trip. With Bella's life endangered by having a baby vein-drainer in utero, the Cullen clan (led by Peter Facinelli and Elizabeth Reaser) debate what to do, while perennial third wheel Jacob Black (Taylor Lautner) finds himself torn between his hopeless love for Bella and the laws of the vampire-hating werewolf pack to which he belongs. Director Bill Condon's adaptation of the first part of novelist Stephenie Meyer's best-seller "Breaking Dawn" includes a sexual interlude, and some grisly ones, that make it unsuitable for youngsters, though mature viewers will recognize a strongly pro-life message being conveyed via the heroine's unusual plight. Possibly acceptable for some mature adolescents. A scene of semi-graphic marital lovemaking, some gory images, an abortion theme, several mild sexual references and jokes, a couple of crass expressions. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG-13 — parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13. (Followed by the sequel "The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn – Part 2" (2012) 8-10 p.m. EDT)

Thursday, June 24, 6-8 p.m. EDT (TCM) "The Family Way" (1967). The lives of a young married couple (Hywell Bennett and Hayley Mills) are fraught with problems, including the groom's temporary inability to consummate their union. The groom's well-meaning but domineering father (John Mills) stands in his son's way, but it is the strengths of family life that save the day. Directed by Roy Boulting with musical score by Paul McCartney. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was L — limited adult audience, films whose problematic content many adults would find troubling. Not rated by the Motion Picture Association.

Saturday, June 26, 1-3:30 p.m. EDT (A&E) "The Day After Tomorrow" (2004). Visually spectacular doomsday drama about a scientist (Dennis Quaid) trying to reunite with his son (Jake Gyllenhaal) during a worldwide environmental catastrophe triggered by global warming which, in addition to unleash-ing monstrous hurricanes, killer tornadoes and biblical-proportion floods, threatens to rapidly plunge Earth into a new ice age. The film is brimming with eye-popping special-effects sequences; director Ro-land Emmerich plays fast and loose with scientific facts to craft a high-concept rollercoaster ride full of escapist thrills but without much of a story beyond its nature-gone-mad premise. Intense scenes of natural disasters. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-II — adults and adolescents. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG-13 — parents are strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

Saturday, June 26, 8-10:10 p.m. EDT (HBO) "The Little Things" (2021). Brooding crime drama, set in 1990 Los Angeles, in which a former LAPD officer (Denzel Washington) who burned out over a murder case and now works for a small sheriff's department makes a brief return visit to the city and is recruited by a homicide sergeant (Rami Malek) to help solve a string of similar killings. But proving the guilt of the suspect (Jared Leto) on whom the duo eventually focuses remains an elusive goal. Some scattered references to religious faith are worked into writer-director John Lee Hancock's script as he seeks to explore moral ambiguity in the context of police work, though his treatment of this theme ultimately feels more muddled than finely balanced. Gruesome post-mortem images, while justified by the context, are not for the squeamish. Gory and disturbing sights, upper female and partial nudity, a few mild oaths, about a half-dozen rough terms, considerable crude and crass language. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was R — restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

Saturday, June 26, 10:10-midnight EDT (Cinemax) "The Way Back" (2020). Director Gavin O'Connor's sports drama tells a story of hope and redemption after devastating loss. When the basketball coach at the Catholic high school he attended suffers a heart attack, a former hoops star-turned-alcoholic-construction-worker (Ben Affleck) reluctantly agrees to take over the program. As he exerts a positive influence on the players (most prominently Brandon Wilson and Melvin Gregg), he finds a new sense of purpose and begins to heal. The film, penned by Brad Ingelsby, does nothing to break free of the traditional formula of sports movies. Yet Affleck carries the proceedings with able acting and the young-er members of the cast, especially Wilson, give believable performances as well. An upbeat tale, though one permeated with off-color dialogue. Mature themes, including alcoholism, a few instances of profanity, frequent crude and crass language, a vulgar sexual reference. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was R — restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.