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Catholic Sentinel | Portland, OR Wednesday, December 7, 2016

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Home : News : Pope Francis/Vatican
On first Friday of Lent, pope speaks on nature of true fasting
Catholic News Service photo
A man prays during Ash Wednesday Mass at St. Andrew's Church in the Manhattan borough of New York March 5. Ash Wednesday marks the start of the penitential season of Lent, a time of reflection, prayer, fasting and charity before Easter.
Catholic News Service photo
A man prays during Ash Wednesday Mass at St. Andrew's Church in the Manhattan borough of New York March 5. Ash Wednesday marks the start of the penitential season of Lent, a time of reflection, prayer, fasting and charity before Easter.
Catholic News Service


VATICAN CITY — Pope Francis criticized those who practice fasting as a mere ritual, rather than as a sacrifice representative of a religion of love.

The pope made his remarks March 7, the first Friday of Lent, in his homily at morning Mass in the Vatican guesthouse, where he lives.

"These hypocritical people are good persons," he said, referring to the Pharisees who criticized Jesus and his followers for not fasting as required by Jewish law. "They do all they should do. They seem good. But they are ethicists without goodness because they have lost the sense of belonging to a people."

True fasting entails sharing goods with the needy, Pope Francis said, according to a report by Vatican Radio.

"This is the charity or fasting that our Lord wants," he said. "This is the mystery of the body and blood of Christ. It means sharing our bread with the hungry, taking care of the sick, the elderly, those who can't give us anything in return: This is not being ashamed of the flesh."

The pope called on Christians to follow the example of the good Samaritan, drawing close to the beneficiaries of their charity in an act of true fraternity.

"When I give alms, do I look into the eyes of my brother, my sister?" he asked. "Am I capable of giving a caress or a hug to the sick, the elderly, the children, or have I lost sight of the meaning of a caress?





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