Home | About Us | Subscriptions | Advertising | El Centinela
Catholic Sentinel | Portland, OR Tuesday, June 28, 2016

Mt Angel Towers Good Llife

Home : News : Pope Francis/Vatican
Pope says abortion, hunger, environmental damage threaten peace
Catholic News Service photo
Children living in a squatters' area wait for a free meal consisting of rice, chicken and vegetables that is given out daily by a South Korean religious missionary organization near Manila, Philippines.
Catholic News Service photo
Children living in a squatters' area wait for a free meal consisting of rice, chicken and vegetables that is given out daily by a South Korean religious missionary organization near Manila, Philippines.
Catholic News Service


VATICAN CITY — Pope Francis said world peace requires the defense of human dignity from violations such as world hunger, human trafficking and abortion.

The pope made his remarks Jan. 13 in his first annual address to the Vatican diplomatic corps, offering a survey of world conflicts and crises he said were caused by "envy, selfishness, rivalry and the thirst for power and money."

Speaking in the Apostolic Palace's Sala Regia, the vast "royal hall" where popes traditionally received Catholic monarchs, Pope Francis spoke of what he has frequently called a "throwaway culture" exemplified by widespread food waste that leaves children starving or malnourished.

"Unfortunately, what is thrown away is not only food or disposable objects, but often human beings themselves, who are discarded as if they were unnecessary," the pope said. "It is horrifying just to think that there are children, victims of abortion, who will never see the light of day; children being used as soldiers, abused and killed in armed conflicts; children turned into merchandise in that terrible form of modern slavery called human trafficking, which is a crime against humanity."

The pope also lamented what he called rising numbers of "broken and troubled families," which he attributed to both moral and material factors: the "weakening sense of belonging so typical of today's world" as well as the "adverse conditions in which many families are forced to live, even to the point where they lack basic means of subsistence."

Noting the devastation caused by typhoon Haiyan in November, Pope Francis warned against "greedy exploitation of environmental resources," and quoted what he said was a popular adage: "God always forgives, we sometimes forgive, but when nature -- creation -- is mistreated, she never forgives!"

Most of the pope's speech was devoted, as usual for the occasion, to geopolitical problems in different regions of the world.

The pope called for an end to the almost three-year old civil war in Syria, voicing hope for upcoming peace talks and praising neighboring Lebanon and Jordan for accepting refugees from the conflict.He also noted what he called "significant progress" in ongoing negotiations over Iran's nuclear program.

Pope Francis lamented the "exodus of Christians from the Middle East and North Africa," as well as violence between Muslims and Christians in Nigeria and the Central African Republic.

Without specifying countries, the pope noted sectarian tensions in Asia, "where growing attitudes of prejudice, for allegedly religious reasons, are tending to deprive Christians of their liberties and to jeopardize civil coexistence."

The pope recalled his July visit to the southern Mediterranean island of Lampedusa, an entry point for immigrants without legal permission to enter Europe, and voiced sympathy with those who, "in the hope of a better life, have undertaken perilous journeys which not infrequently end in tragedy."

"I think in particular of the many migrants from Latin America bound for the United States," he said, "but above all those from Africa and the Middle East who seek refuge in Europe."

After his speech, the pope personally greeted the attending ambassadors and their spouses. The Holy See has full diplomatic relations with 180 nation-states, the European Union and the Sovereign Military Order of Malta, as well as "relations of a special nature" with the Palestine Liberation Organization.





Article Comment Submissions
Submit your comments, please. 
 
Comments are reviewed before being posted to the site. Comments must use respectful language and address the story. Comments are not posted immediately to the site. The site editor may edit content for appropriateness. There may be a delay of 24-48 hours. Comments may also be considered to appear as letters in our print edition, unless the writer specifices no.
 
Note: All information on this form is required. Your telephone number is for our use only, and will not be attached to your comment.
Submit an Article Comment
First Name:
Required
Last Name:
Required
Telephone:
Required
Email:
Required
Comment:
Required
Passcode:
Required
Anti-SPAM Passcode Click here to see a new mix of characters.
This is an anti-SPAM device. It is not case sensitive.
   


Advanced Search










Mary Jo Tully ~ The Path to Resurrection

News | Viewpoints | Faith & Spirituality | Parish and School Life | Entertainment | Obituaries | Find Churches and Schools | About Us | Subscriptions | Advertising
E-Newsletter | RSS Feeds

© 2016 Catholic Sentinel, a service of Oregon Catholic Press

Software © 1998-2016 1up! Software, All Rights Reserved