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Arizona law case has implications beyond
Catholic News Service photo
Water and food for migrants from Mexico that were left along a desert trail by volunteers with No More Deaths are seen in late January in Arivaca Junction, Ariz. When the U.S. Supreme Court considers the constitutionality of Arizona's 2010 immigration l aw April 25, the eventual ruling will have an effect on far more than one border state's relationship to its own residents.
Catholic News Service photo
Water and food for migrants from Mexico that were left along a desert trail by volunteers with No More Deaths are seen in late January in Arivaca Junction, Ariz. When the U.S. Supreme Court considers the constitutionality of Arizona's 2010 immigration l aw April 25, the eventual ruling will have an effect on far more than one border state's relationship to its own residents.
Catholic News Service


When the Supreme Court considers the constitutionality of Arizona’s 2010 immigration law, the weight of an eventual ruling will come to bear on far more than one border state’s relationship to its own residents.

The half-dozen states that have passed laws modeled on Arizona’s, the 20 that have considered doing so could be affected by the outcome of Arizona v. United States. So could the practices of churches, employers and social service providers. Foreign relations and business ventures also may be affected.

And there’s a chance the court won’t be able to come to a clear decision because Justice Elena Kagan has recused herself from participating, leaving the possibility of a 4-4 vote. Unless that happens, the court is likely to issue a decision just before it recesses at the end of June.

“Copycat” legislation, much of it drafted by the same Kansas attorney who helped write Arizona’s law, roiled other states, particularly Alabama. As that state’s law made it illegal to rent or provide utility service without proof of the customer’s immigration status, thousands of immigrants moved away, leaving Alabama’s agriculture industry reeling from lost workers while crops rotted in the fields.





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