Home | About Us | Subscriptions | Advertising | El Centinela
Catholic Sentinel | Portland, OR Monday, July 25, 2016

cyo champions of faith 2017

Home : Special Features : North Catholic High School
6/29/2010 4:16:00 PM
Vision for a co-ed Catholic high school emerged in late '50s
Fr. Francis Maloney, principal, with some of the first North Catholic graduates in 1962: Randall Hamsik, John Sherlock, Mary Miller and John Lauer.
Fr. Francis Maloney, principal, with some of the first North Catholic graduates in 1962: Randall Hamsik, John Sherlock, Mary Miller and John Lauer.
North Catholic High School photoNorth Catholic's 1967-68 student government officers: Dianne Devenney, Charles Walsh, Robert Boehmer, Sara McMahon and Stephanie Schopf.
North Catholic High School photo
North Catholic's 1967-68 student government officers: Dianne Devenney, Charles Walsh, Robert Boehmer, Sara McMahon and Stephanie Schopf.
+ view more photos
An assembly.
Historical context 1970
• National Guard troops fire on students at Kent State Univeristy, killing four.

•  New missal published guiding the post-Vatican II Mass.

• The Concord makes its first supersonic flight.

• New St. Vincent Hospital west of Portland constructed.

• The average new house costs $23,450. Households make an average of $9,400 per year.

• Gas costs 36 cents per gallon and postage stamps cost 6 cents.

• Church in Oregon opposes lift on bans against homosexual acts.

• Paul McCartney announces that the Beatles have disbanded

• Mount Angel Abbey Library built.

• The US Population reaches 205 million

• In Congress, Sen. Bob Packwood of Oregon proposes legalization of abortion and withholding tax benefits for families who have more than three children.

• Controlled Substance Act passed.

• Popular films include M*A*S*H and Patton

• Workshops on Black history begin at Central Catholic, St. Mary's Academy.

• Popular songs include the Beatles "Let it Be" and the Jackson 5's "ABC."

• Two Holy Names Sisters die near Roseburg when their car careens into the chilly South Umpqua River.

Ed Langlois
Of the Catholic Sentinel

One evening in the mid-1950s, Father Francis Maloney sat in a Chinese restaurant on North Lombard Street in Portland.

The beefy priest gazed across the road at a massive, empty wooden building. Peninsula Grade School had been shuttered in 1953.

What could be done with an old place like that? wondered Father Maloney, then disciplinarian at Central Catholic High School.

Within a few years, the structure at North Lombard and Emerald streets and its 3.5 acres would be sold to the Archdiocese of Portland for $84,000. Renovation to accommodate a new high school would cost $185,000. The money came from a fund begun in 1956 to mark the jubilee of Archbishop Edward Howard.

Father Maloney, 41, would become founding principal of North Catholic High, which opened in fall, 1958. It was the only co-ed Catholic high school in Portland’s city limits.  
Conditions had aligned for the new venture.

Families in North Portland were mostly blue collar, with World War II veteran fathers who worked in industry on Swan Island or at Vanport. The Baby Boom children were coming of age and many parents were not completely satisfied with the public education offerings in the area. On top of that, Columbia Prep, a Catholic boys school located on the University of Portland campus, had closed in 1955.   

“If ever there were a need for a Christian school, it was North Catholic,” says Marv Delplanche, who taught at North Catholic from 1964 until 1970. “It was innovative, a great school with great morals.”

The new school’s motto was Fiat Voluntas Tua, “Thy Will Be Done.”

It was the age of Red scares, thin ties, bouffant hair and cheerleader skirts at the knee. Also in the air were new ideas in a church that had long avoided co-education for teens. North Catholic faculty included Sisters of St. Francis from Glen Riddle, Pa. and two Sisters of St. Francis of the Holy Family, plus several diocesan priests.

The school enrolled 117 students that first year, 61 boys and 56 girls. An additional 130 youths began in 1959 and the ball was rolling.

North Catholic had a chapel to seat 70 worshipers, a gym and a football field. By 1961, a $125,000 science building was constructed in response to Sputnik, the Russian satellite that gave the U.S. a scientific inferiority complex.

In October 1964, Father Richard Fall chose North Catholic for what the Catholic Sentinel called the city’s first vernacular Mass open to the public. It was billed as a demonstration of the new liturgy developed at the Second Vatican Council.  

By the time fire destroyed the school in 1970, it would have 430 students and be a beloved neighborhood institution.  

Now what remains of North Catholic buildings are the gym and science building, formerly used by a boys and girls club.

An Arby’s restaurant occupies the spot where the main school building stood, a patch of earth still sacred to many alumni and parents.



Advanced Search






Mary Jo Tully ~ The Path to Resurrection

News | Viewpoints | Faith & Spirituality | Parish and School Life | Entertainment | Obituaries | Find Churches and Schools | About Us | Subscriptions | Advertising
E-Newsletter | RSS Feeds

© 2016 Catholic Sentinel, a service of Oregon Catholic Press

Software © 1998-2016 1up! Software, All Rights Reserved