Catholic News Service
Young people thankful for deferred deportation and their supporters gather for Mass at the Our Lady of Guadalupe Shrine in Des Plaines, Ill.
Catholic News Service
Young people thankful for deferred deportation and their supporters gather for Mass at the Our Lady of Guadalupe Shrine in Des Plaines, Ill.
It’s been two years since the federal government started putting off deportation for young immigrants who were brought across the border illegally by their parents.

This sensible law has benefitted not only those youths, but our society as a whole.

Take Jesus Castro of San Francisco. A student at Sonoma State University, he plans to attend law school and pass the bar in California. Gerardo Torres, a 19 year-old raised in Colorado, is able to study to become a civil engineer.

In Oregon, consider Miriam Corona. A native of Dayton, she is a political science major at Linfield College and a student leader. For one school project, Corona assembled an oral history of her church, San Martin de Porres. Off campus, she volunteers to help immigrants and hopes some day to be the first Latina from Oregon in the U.S. Senate.

There are hundreds of other stories and they make our eyes water. When these young people got even a small chance, they stepped up admirably.  

Two years ago, Archbishop Jose Gomez of Los Angeles predicted that the young people would bring their talents to our communities. He called them “bright, energetic, and eager.” He was right.  

Given the success, we should consider expanding deferred action to other immigrants. Some have suggested that the status go first to parents of the youths already allowed to stay. This would keep families together and create stronger neighborhoods, towns and cities. Ultimately, our nation would be a richer place.