Catholic News Service photo
Honduran farmer digs a channel for water in his field.
Catholic News Service photo
Honduran farmer digs a channel for water in his field.
WASHINGTON — A small plot of land provides a single mother in Honduras with the corn and beans her family needs to eat, but as a result of recent droughts, she’s left peeling back the husk of her shrinking cornstalks asking, “What can I do?”

Paul Hicks, regional coordinator for Global Water Initiative, an international coalition that includes Catholic Relief Services, estimates that Central Americans who farm to support only their families make up about 50 percent of the region’s farmers.

Because of a predicted 1 degree Celsius temperature increase by 2020, these corn and bean farmers in Central America could be in danger, says a new report titled “Tortillas on the Roaster.”

The climate change, if not adapted to, will increase poverty levels for Central American families as well as increase the immigration rate, says the report, published by CRS, which led the study.

“Without a serious investment in agricultural recovery in Central America, there will certainly be more pressure for people to migrate and look for work” said Hicks, “either from rural to urban areas, or to the U.S.”
 
Guatemalans are more likely to migrate into the wetlands rather than leave the country altogether.