Catholic Sentinel photo by Kim Nguyen
A tearful Miriam Corona tells her story in 2012. Her application will need to be renewed.
Catholic Sentinel photo by Kim Nguyen
A tearful Miriam Corona tells her story in 2012. Her application will need to be renewed.
Undocumented young people could soon be under threat of deportation if they don’t take steps to renew their Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals before it expires. The federal provision, commonly called DACA, is a set of administrative procedures initiated by the Obama Administration in 2012 to offer two years’ protection against the threat of deportation to undocumented young people who met certain criteria. Those who have been granted DACA and a work permit will see them expire after two years if they are not renewed.

Those who received DACA in late 2012 or even 2013 need to be thinking now about renewal. Federal officials are recommending that applicants apply four to five months in advance of their work permit expiration.

“It’s important for anyone who knows their DACA is expiring in the coming months to understand that renewal is essential,” says As Alexandra Blodget of Catholic Charities, which has helped many youths comply with the law. “Without it, people will no longer have authorization to work in the US and will not be lawfully present which does carry the risk of detention and/or deportation.”

In response to the demand for legal advice about DACA renewal, a group of immigration law organizations has come together to offer help. On Wednesday, Aug. 6 at Catholic Charities in Portland, immigration attorneys offered $20 consultations in Portland. Spanish speakers and English speakers were available.  

“We would strongly encourage anyone planning for DACA renewal to get advice before they submit their application if they have any concerns, particularly if they’ve been arrested or convicted of an offense or had other involvement with law enforcement since first receiving DACA,” Blodget says.